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The impact of willow encroachment on water and carbon exchange in the vegetation of a subtropical wetland

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Date Issued:
2015
Summary:
Shortened periods of inundation due to water management have led to the encroachment and expansion of Carolina willow (Salix caroliniana) in sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) marsh communities. Morphologic and physiologic differences between sawgrass and willow have potential consequences for microhabitat conditions and ecosystem function such as a reduction in temperatures and light availability and changes in primary productivity. Since it is a woody shrub, willow is often assumed to exhibit higher rates of transpiration than non woody plants, which in turn can affect photosynthesis and carbon exchange and ultimately wetland water management. In this study willow was found to have higher rates of stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (Anet) than sawgrass. However, sawgrass had greater intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) than willow. This suggests that willow is capable of greater gas exchange and carbon assimilation than sawgrass but requires more water. Understanding the implications of willow expansion will improve landscape models of wetland water and carbon exchange and inform water management decisions.
Title: The impact of willow encroachment on water and carbon exchange in the vegetation of a subtropical wetland.
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Name(s): Budny, Michelle L., author
Benscoter, Brian, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Biological Sciences
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2015
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 59 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Shortened periods of inundation due to water management have led to the encroachment and expansion of Carolina willow (Salix caroliniana) in sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) marsh communities. Morphologic and physiologic differences between sawgrass and willow have potential consequences for microhabitat conditions and ecosystem function such as a reduction in temperatures and light availability and changes in primary productivity. Since it is a woody shrub, willow is often assumed to exhibit higher rates of transpiration than non woody plants, which in turn can affect photosynthesis and carbon exchange and ultimately wetland water management. In this study willow was found to have higher rates of stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (Anet) than sawgrass. However, sawgrass had greater intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) than willow. This suggests that willow is capable of greater gas exchange and carbon assimilation than sawgrass but requires more water. Understanding the implications of willow expansion will improve landscape models of wetland water and carbon exchange and inform water management decisions.
Identifier: FA00004350 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2015.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Biogeochemistry
Ecosystem management
Surfaces (Technology) -- Measurement
Vegetation dynamics
Wetland ecology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004350
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004350
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.