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A critical feminist science studies critique of the term 'pseudoscience'

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Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
Using a Critical Feminist Science Studies perspective, I examine how the term 'pseudoscience’ rewrites science’s history, preventing science from being held accountable for its power structures and hierarchical narratives. I first examine the historical and cultural origins of science, the figure of the scientist, and 'objectivity.' Then, I explore science's obsession with the body in the many works and theories that have been developed since its origination in the seventeenth century. Finally, I apply critical feminist science studies to Michael Shermer's usage of the word 'pseudoscience' in his book, Why People Believe Weird Things. My proposed solution is that we stop using such a term in order to hold science accountable for its problematic aspects and legacies. I also suggest that we adopt Donna Haraway’s concept of ‘situated knowledge’ to replace objectivity.
Title: A critical feminist science studies critique of the term 'pseudoscience'.
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Name(s): Lewycky, Zoe
Njambi, Wairimũ
Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Thesis
Date Created: Spring 2013
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Florida
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 77 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Using a Critical Feminist Science Studies perspective, I examine how the term 'pseudoscience’ rewrites science’s history, preventing science from being held accountable for its power structures and hierarchical narratives. I first examine the historical and cultural origins of science, the figure of the scientist, and 'objectivity.' Then, I explore science's obsession with the body in the many works and theories that have been developed since its origination in the seventeenth century. Finally, I apply critical feminist science studies to Michael Shermer's usage of the word 'pseudoscience' in his book, Why People Believe Weird Things. My proposed solution is that we stop using such a term in order to hold science accountable for its problematic aspects and legacies. I also suggest that we adopt Donna Haraway’s concept of ‘situated knowledge’ to replace objectivity.
Identifier: FA00003523 (IID)
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Thesis (B.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, 2013.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: FAU Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00003523
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.
Is Part of Series: FAU Honors Theses Digital Collection.

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