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Seasonal effects on the prevalence and intensity of the parasite Bonamia spp. in bivalves from the Indian River Lagoon

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Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
Bonamia spp., a haplosporidian protistan parasite, was first reported in Florida in 2007 in oyster species cultured at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in water from the Indian River Lagoon. Previous research (summer 2010 and 2011) evaluated prevalence and intensity of infections in IRL bivalve species. This study seeks to examine the seasonal effect on parasite prevalence and infection intensity. Bivalves from three sites in the IRL were sampled summer, fall, and winter 2012. Prevalence (general and species specific) was evaluated using PCR. Intensity of infection was evaluated using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Highest prevalence (31.9-48.9%) was seen at all three sites in the fall. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed highest intensity in the fall (2.08) and lowest in the summer (0.85). Overall prevalence and intensity of infection followed the seasonal trend observed by other researchers in more temperate regions with harsher winter seasons than Florida.
Title: Seasonal effects on the prevalence and intensity of the parasite Bonamia spp. in bivalves from the Indian River Lagoon.
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Name(s): Gallagher, Kaitlin
Moore, Jon
Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Thesis
Date Created: Spring 2013
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: pdf
Extent: 47 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Bonamia spp., a haplosporidian protistan parasite, was first reported in Florida in 2007 in oyster species cultured at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in water from the Indian River Lagoon. Previous research (summer 2010 and 2011) evaluated prevalence and intensity of infections in IRL bivalve species. This study seeks to examine the seasonal effect on parasite prevalence and infection intensity. Bivalves from three sites in the IRL were sampled summer, fall, and winter 2012. Prevalence (general and species specific) was evaluated using PCR. Intensity of infection was evaluated using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Highest prevalence (31.9-48.9%) was seen at all three sites in the fall. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed highest intensity in the fall (2.08) and lowest in the summer (0.85). Overall prevalence and intensity of infection followed the seasonal trend observed by other researchers in more temperate regions with harsher winter seasons than Florida.
Identifier: FA00003513 (IID)
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Thesis (B.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, 2013.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: FAU Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00003513
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Host Institution: FAU

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