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Adopting the orphan: determining the role of the motor protein KIF9 during the cell cycle

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Date Issued:
2012
Summary:
The kinesin superfamily of microtubule motor proteins is subdivided into families based upon structure and function. KIF9 is the founding member of the Kinesin-9 family, which is a largely uncharacterized group of kinesins. It was originally identified by sequence homology to other kinesins. Subsequent studies have shown that KIF9 interacts with proteins involved in cell shape remodeling, cell migration and proper centrosomal positioning. We have examined KIF9 function in mammalian cells using shRNA-mediated knockdown and GFP-plasmid overexpression. By knocking dow KIF9 expression in these cells, we have seen several effects on normal cell cycle progression. Using various cell cycle markers, we have observed a decrease in the number of cells in late S phase. In addition, there is a marked increase in the number of cells in early mitosis in unexpected time intervals. We propose that KIF9 is required for proper cell progression, via a potentially novel checkpoint mechanism.
Title: Adopting the orphan: determining the role of the motor protein KIF9 during the cell cycle.
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Name(s): Rivera Rios, Miguel E.
Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Thesis
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: 36 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The kinesin superfamily of microtubule motor proteins is subdivided into families based upon structure and function. KIF9 is the founding member of the Kinesin-9 family, which is a largely uncharacterized group of kinesins. It was originally identified by sequence homology to other kinesins. Subsequent studies have shown that KIF9 interacts with proteins involved in cell shape remodeling, cell migration and proper centrosomal positioning. We have examined KIF9 function in mammalian cells using shRNA-mediated knockdown and GFP-plasmid overexpression. By knocking dow KIF9 expression in these cells, we have seen several effects on normal cell cycle progression. Using various cell cycle markers, we have observed a decrease in the number of cells in late S phase. In addition, there is a marked increase in the number of cells in early mitosis in unexpected time intervals. We propose that KIF9 is required for proper cell progression, via a potentially novel checkpoint mechanism.
Identifier: 819546183 (oclc), 3359321 (digitool), FADT3359321 (IID), fau:1449 (fedora)
Note(s): by Miguel E. Rivera Rios.
Thesis (B.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, Honors College, 2012.
Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Cell organelles -- Formation
Cellular signal transduction
Protoplasmic streaming
Cells -- Motility
Cell division -- Research
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/3359321
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FADT3359321
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.
Is Part of Series: FAU Honors Theses Digital Collection.

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