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Cross-border M&A deal incompletion: institutional processes and outcomes

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
My objective in this dissertation was to understand the processes leading to incompletion of the high profile cross-border deals. A conceptual framework was developed which suggests that announcement of a cross-border merger and acquisition (M&A) deal starts a string of institutional processes that leads to incompletion of the bid. I proposed that less powerful host country actors threatened by the MNC’s bid proposal politicize the transaction turning the deal into a transgression. These actors publicize this transgression, initiating a scandal, to gather support of multiple audiences in their attempts to thwart the threat that the MNC poses. Thanks to their efforts in appealing to audiences and publicization of the deal as a transgression, these actors mobilize audiences who reveal hostile reaction against the MNC and the proposed bid. Such mobilization and hostile reaction, in turn, lead to proposed bid’s incompletion. Qualitative analysis results based on a sample of seven high profile cross-border transactions provided support for the conceptualized processes, namely politicization, scandal, mobilization and hostile reaction, while indicating a different order of process progression compared to the linear one conceptualized. I found that in all cases the process of scandal subsumed the other processes that kept scandal alive. In turn, scandal fed these processes giving more leverage to the mobilization efforts and/or increasing the hostility of the actors opposing the deal. The findings revealed that these processes happened simultaneously and that in cases where mobilization did not emerge, hostile reaction substituted for the lack of mobilization. Additionally, analysis showed that not only less powerful actors but also powerful actors, elites, sought to initiate a scandal when the host country political, legal or bureaucratic processes did not work for them in thwarting the deal. This dissertation by examining social construction, power and politics within the host country institutional environment in the context of high profile cross-border deals, presented a framework that explained how and why the hostility leading to deal incompletion emerges in the host country. In so doing, this dissertation strengthens institutional theory, theory of scandal, social movements theory and elite theory as powerful perspectives in international strategic -management.
Title: Cross-border M&A deal incompletion: institutional processes and outcomes.
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Name(s): Yapici, Nilufer, author
Hudson, Bryant A., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Business
Department of Management
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2014
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 386 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: My objective in this dissertation was to understand the processes leading to incompletion of the high profile cross-border deals. A conceptual framework was developed which suggests that announcement of a cross-border merger and acquisition (M&A) deal starts a string of institutional processes that leads to incompletion of the bid. I proposed that less powerful host country actors threatened by the MNC’s bid proposal politicize the transaction turning the deal into a transgression. These actors publicize this transgression, initiating a scandal, to gather support of multiple audiences in their attempts to thwart the threat that the MNC poses. Thanks to their efforts in appealing to audiences and publicization of the deal as a transgression, these actors mobilize audiences who reveal hostile reaction against the MNC and the proposed bid. Such mobilization and hostile reaction, in turn, lead to proposed bid’s incompletion. Qualitative analysis results based on a sample of seven high profile cross-border transactions provided support for the conceptualized processes, namely politicization, scandal, mobilization and hostile reaction, while indicating a different order of process progression compared to the linear one conceptualized. I found that in all cases the process of scandal subsumed the other processes that kept scandal alive. In turn, scandal fed these processes giving more leverage to the mobilization efforts and/or increasing the hostility of the actors opposing the deal. The findings revealed that these processes happened simultaneously and that in cases where mobilization did not emerge, hostile reaction substituted for the lack of mobilization. Additionally, analysis showed that not only less powerful actors but also powerful actors, elites, sought to initiate a scandal when the host country political, legal or bureaucratic processes did not work for them in thwarting the deal. This dissertation by examining social construction, power and politics within the host country institutional environment in the context of high profile cross-border deals, presented a framework that explained how and why the hostility leading to deal incompletion emerges in the host country. In so doing, this dissertation strengthens institutional theory, theory of scandal, social movements theory and elite theory as powerful perspectives in international strategic -management.
Identifier: FA00004240 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2014.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Consolidation and merger of corporations
Corporate governance
International business enterprises -- Management
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004240
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.