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Human capital and endogenous growth

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Date Issued:
1999
Summary:
Using both exogenous and endogenous theory, this paper develops a synthesized model treating human capital as an endogenous contributor to long run economic growth. Human capital is assumed to be the basis of such growth, therefore, the focus is not on technological change per se. Through empirical analysis, human capital is measured by knowledge, and that the accumulation of knowledge, or specialization, is determined through an incentive system. The incentive system, in turn, is determined by the difference in wages paid to certain types of knowledge, those being a general level and a specialized level of knowledge. It is assumed that the learning process can take place at any time, therefore, the specialization process is not limited to an academic environment. A spillover effect associated with specialized knowledge provides for increasing returns to scale in the model, which is also supported by empirical data.
Title: Human capital and endogenous growth.
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Name(s): Stewart, John Richard.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Yuhn, Ky-hyang, Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 1999
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 83 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Using both exogenous and endogenous theory, this paper develops a synthesized model treating human capital as an endogenous contributor to long run economic growth. Human capital is assumed to be the basis of such growth, therefore, the focus is not on technological change per se. Through empirical analysis, human capital is measured by knowledge, and that the accumulation of knowledge, or specialization, is determined through an incentive system. The incentive system, in turn, is determined by the difference in wages paid to certain types of knowledge, those being a general level and a specialized level of knowledge. It is assumed that the learning process can take place at any time, therefore, the specialization process is not limited to an academic environment. A spillover effect associated with specialized knowledge provides for increasing returns to scale in the model, which is also supported by empirical data.
Identifier: 9780599218826 (isbn), 15659 (digitool), FADT15659 (IID), fau:12416 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Business
Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1999.
Subject(s): Human capital
Economic development
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/15659
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.