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development of an animal model for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Effects of frontal lesions on activity in neonatal rats

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Date Issued:
1997
Summary:
This study was designed to develop an animal model of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder based on frontal cortical functioning in 3, 6, 9, & 12-day-old neonatal rats. In Expt. 1, frontal cortical activity was suppressed with intracranial injections of lidocaine, a local anesthetic. In Expt. 2, frontal activity was suppressed with brain transections. Pups in both experiments were tested in a habituation-to-odor learning paradigm and behaviors including general activity, headwaving, probing, and rolling were recorded. Results indicated that frontal cortical suppression, caused by either lidocaine injection or brain transection, resulted in significantly higher activity levels in 3-day-olds particularly with regard to rolling, suggesting that the frontal cortex is involved in the regulation of rolling behavior. Frontal transections, but not lidocaine injections, also significantly increased activity in 12-day-old pups due to increased locomotor probing and wall climbing. Results are consistent with the neuropsychological research regarding frontal cortical functioning and inhibition in children with ADHD, and show potential as a future animal model of ADHD.
Title: The development of an animal model for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Effects of frontal lesions on activity in neonatal rats.
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Name(s): Stevenson, Bernadette Mietus
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Johanson, Ingrid B., Thesis advisor
Terry, Leslie M., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1997
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 83 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This study was designed to develop an animal model of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder based on frontal cortical functioning in 3, 6, 9, & 12-day-old neonatal rats. In Expt. 1, frontal cortical activity was suppressed with intracranial injections of lidocaine, a local anesthetic. In Expt. 2, frontal activity was suppressed with brain transections. Pups in both experiments were tested in a habituation-to-odor learning paradigm and behaviors including general activity, headwaving, probing, and rolling were recorded. Results indicated that frontal cortical suppression, caused by either lidocaine injection or brain transection, resulted in significantly higher activity levels in 3-day-olds particularly with regard to rolling, suggesting that the frontal cortex is involved in the regulation of rolling behavior. Frontal transections, but not lidocaine injections, also significantly increased activity in 12-day-old pups due to increased locomotor probing and wall climbing. Results are consistent with the neuropsychological research regarding frontal cortical functioning and inhibition in children with ADHD, and show potential as a future animal model of ADHD.
Identifier: 9780591625172 (isbn), 15516 (digitool), FADT15516 (IID), fau:12278 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1997.
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Subject(s): Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--Diagnosis
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/15516
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.