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Miami's second ghetto

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Date Issued:
1994
Summary:
The purpose of this thesis is to examine the social and institutional forces that created the second ghetto in Miami during the three decades following World War II. During this period, Miami's inner-city ghetto was razed and a new ghetto, sanctioned by federal and local legislation and agencies, was established in the northwest section of Dade County. The northwest section, which contained a few black enclaves in 1945, was transformed into a sprawling black ghetto by 1960. The transition of the area from predominantly white to black produced racial conflicts that erupted into violence as the white majority tried to uphold segregation in Miami. In 1980, 85 percent of Dade County's African American population resided in the northwest section. This did not happen by accident; Miami's second ghetto was shaped, maintained, and reinforced through government policy, the real estate industry, and racial prejudice.
Title: Miami's second ghetto.
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Name(s): Van Dyke, Teresa B.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Mohl, Raymond A., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1994
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 114 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this thesis is to examine the social and institutional forces that created the second ghetto in Miami during the three decades following World War II. During this period, Miami's inner-city ghetto was razed and a new ghetto, sanctioned by federal and local legislation and agencies, was established in the northwest section of Dade County. The northwest section, which contained a few black enclaves in 1945, was transformed into a sprawling black ghetto by 1960. The transition of the area from predominantly white to black produced racial conflicts that erupted into violence as the white majority tried to uphold segregation in Miami. In 1980, 85 percent of Dade County's African American population resided in the northwest section. This did not happen by accident; Miami's second ghetto was shaped, maintained, and reinforced through government policy, the real estate industry, and racial prejudice.
Identifier: 15047 (digitool), FADT15047 (IID), fau:11825 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1994.
Subject(s): African Americans--Housing--Florida--Miami--History
Miami (Fla)--Race relations--History
Housing policy--Florida--Miami--History
Discrimination in housing--Florida--Miami--History
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/15047
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.