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investigation of the possible intermittent dynamics in the transition region between two modes of behavior using delays

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Date Issued:
1994
Summary:
In this thesis the transition region between two modes of behavior is explored using a novel technique, delayed feedback, and a variety of dynamical systems measures. In a previous study, Engstrom, Kelso, and Holroyd (to appear) established the existence of a transition between anticipatory and reactive behavior in a sensorimotor coordination task as a control parameter (frequency) was varied. Here, in order to explore the hypothesis that the behavioral dynamics during this transition are intermittent in character, subjects were asked to synchronize with a metronome that was actually a delayed copy of their own response pattern. The use of delayed feedback was expected to destabilize the behavioral dynamics enough to allow the observation of hypothesized intermittent phenomena. Use of delayed feedback was shown to destabilize synchronization, resulting in the emergence of a new behavioral pattern in the transition region that exhibited complex "bursting" dynamics. Analysis revealed that this bursting behavior displays many of the characteristics common to intermittency, which supports the idea that the anticipation-reaction transition is the result of a neurobehavioral dynamical system losing stability. Living in the vicinity of instabilities may be an important mechanism for biological organisms to maintain both flexibility and stability.
Title: An investigation of the possible intermittent dynamics in the transition region between two modes of behavior using delays.
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Name(s): Holroyd, Tom
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Kelso, J. A. Scott, Thesis advisor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Psychology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1994
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, FL
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 113 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: In this thesis the transition region between two modes of behavior is explored using a novel technique, delayed feedback, and a variety of dynamical systems measures. In a previous study, Engstrom, Kelso, and Holroyd (to appear) established the existence of a transition between anticipatory and reactive behavior in a sensorimotor coordination task as a control parameter (frequency) was varied. Here, in order to explore the hypothesis that the behavioral dynamics during this transition are intermittent in character, subjects were asked to synchronize with a metronome that was actually a delayed copy of their own response pattern. The use of delayed feedback was expected to destabilize the behavioral dynamics enough to allow the observation of hypothesized intermittent phenomena. Use of delayed feedback was shown to destabilize synchronization, resulting in the emergence of a new behavioral pattern in the transition region that exhibited complex "bursting" dynamics. Analysis revealed that this bursting behavior displays many of the characteristics common to intermittency, which supports the idea that the anticipation-reaction transition is the result of a neurobehavioral dynamical system losing stability. Living in the vicinity of instabilities may be an important mechanism for biological organisms to maintain both flexibility and stability.
Identifier: 15042 (digitool), FADT15042 (IID), fau:11820 (fedora)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1994.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Subject(s): Biological rhythms
Human mechanics
Circadian rhythms
Biological control systems
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/15042
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.