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Evolutionary algorithms for design and control of material handling and manufacturing systems

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Date Issued:
1994
Summary:
The crucial goal of enhancing industrial productivity has led researchers to look for robust and efficient solutions to problems in production systems. Evolving technologies has also, led to an immediate demand for algorithms which can exploit these developments. During the last three decades there has been a growing interest in algorithms which rely on analogies to natural processes. The best known algorithms in this class include evolutionary programming, genetic algorithms, evolution strategies and neural networks. The emergence of massively parallel systems has made these inherently parallel algorithms of high practical interest. The advantages offered by these algorithms over other classical techniques has resulted in their wide acceptance. These algorithms have been applied for solving a large class of interesting problems, for which no efficient or reasonably fast algorithm exists. This thesis extends their usage to the domain of production research. Problems of high practical interest in the domain of production research are solved using a subclass of these algorithms i.e. those based on the principle of evolution. The problems include: the flowpath design of AGV systems and vehicle routing in a transportation system. Furthermore, a Genetic Based Machine Learning (GBML) system has been developed for optimal scheduling and control of a job shop.
Title: Evolutionary algorithms for design and control of material handling and manufacturing systems.
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Name(s): Kanwar, Pankaj.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Han, Chingping (Jim), Thesis advisor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1994
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 105 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The crucial goal of enhancing industrial productivity has led researchers to look for robust and efficient solutions to problems in production systems. Evolving technologies has also, led to an immediate demand for algorithms which can exploit these developments. During the last three decades there has been a growing interest in algorithms which rely on analogies to natural processes. The best known algorithms in this class include evolutionary programming, genetic algorithms, evolution strategies and neural networks. The emergence of massively parallel systems has made these inherently parallel algorithms of high practical interest. The advantages offered by these algorithms over other classical techniques has resulted in their wide acceptance. These algorithms have been applied for solving a large class of interesting problems, for which no efficient or reasonably fast algorithm exists. This thesis extends their usage to the domain of production research. Problems of high practical interest in the domain of production research are solved using a subclass of these algorithms i.e. those based on the principle of evolution. The problems include: the flowpath design of AGV systems and vehicle routing in a transportation system. Furthermore, a Genetic Based Machine Learning (GBML) system has been developed for optimal scheduling and control of a job shop.
Identifier: 15025 (digitool), FADT15025 (IID), fau:11803 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Engineering and Computer Science
Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1994.
Subject(s): Industrial productivity--Data processing
Algorithms
Genetic algorithms
Motor vehicles--Automatic location systems
Materials handling--Computer simulation
Manufacturing processes--Computer simulation
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/15025
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.