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Effect of strain rate and temperature on the stress corrosion cracking tendency of engineering alloys in acidified seawater

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Date Issued:
1992
Summary:
The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tendencies of several engineering alloys were studied in an acidified seawater environment as a function of applied strain rate and electrolyte temperature. The selected alloys included austenitic stainless steels 304L, 316L, 904L and A-286 (an iron-based superalloy at two heat treatments yielding ultimate tensile strengths of 130 and 200 ksi), Inconel 718 (220 ksi ultimate tensile strength) and Hastelloys C-22 and C-276. The slow strain rate test technique was used to evaluate the SCC strain rate dependency of each alloy at extension rates of 4.7 x 10^-6, 4.7 x 10^-4 and 4.7 x 10^-3 mm/sec. The effect of electrolyte temperature was evaluated at 38C and 60C at a single extension rate of 4.7 x 10^-5 mm/sec. Control specimens were tested in a laboratory air environment at an extension rate of 4.7 x 10^-5 mm/sec. Various mechanical parameters of the specimens tested in the corrosive medium were compared with those of control specimens to quantify the degree of cracking. Fractographic evidence of SCC was obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An attempt was made to correlate SCC tendency with the alloy's passivation kinetics and microstructure. Atmospheric exposure testing was performed in a simulated space shuttle launch pad environment for selected alloys.
Title: Effect of strain rate and temperature on the stress corrosion cracking tendency of engineering alloys in acidified seawater.
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Name(s): Kundalgurki, Srivatsa G.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Lipka, Stephen M., Thesis advisor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1992
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 191 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tendencies of several engineering alloys were studied in an acidified seawater environment as a function of applied strain rate and electrolyte temperature. The selected alloys included austenitic stainless steels 304L, 316L, 904L and A-286 (an iron-based superalloy at two heat treatments yielding ultimate tensile strengths of 130 and 200 ksi), Inconel 718 (220 ksi ultimate tensile strength) and Hastelloys C-22 and C-276. The slow strain rate test technique was used to evaluate the SCC strain rate dependency of each alloy at extension rates of 4.7 x 10^-6, 4.7 x 10^-4 and 4.7 x 10^-3 mm/sec. The effect of electrolyte temperature was evaluated at 38C and 60C at a single extension rate of 4.7 x 10^-5 mm/sec. Control specimens were tested in a laboratory air environment at an extension rate of 4.7 x 10^-5 mm/sec. Various mechanical parameters of the specimens tested in the corrosive medium were compared with those of control specimens to quantify the degree of cracking. Fractographic evidence of SCC was obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An attempt was made to correlate SCC tendency with the alloy's passivation kinetics and microstructure. Atmospheric exposure testing was performed in a simulated space shuttle launch pad environment for selected alloys.
Identifier: 14853 (digitool), FADT14853 (IID), fau:11639 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Engineering and Computer Science
Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1992.
Subject(s): Alloys--Stress corrosion
Stress corrosion
Sea-water corrosion
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/14853
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.