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black struggle for political and Civil Rights in Broward County, 1943-1989

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Date Issued:
1990
Summary:
During the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, Broward County blacks established their place in the ranks of freedom fighters. The Supreme Court decision of 1944 in the case of Smith v. Allright opened the door for the black community to become involved in the political process. Jim Crow laws were eliminated throughout the south. Other covert barriers are now being overcome. At-large elections that prevent black representation are being overturned. Annexation of black neighborhoods has still not been accomplished to any great extent. As a result, thousands of Broward's black residents have no voice in municipal government. Qualified black residents are not registering to vote in numbers that reflect their population. Despite fair housing legislation, discrimination in housing is rampant. Police departments have yet to meet agreed quotas of black officers under federal consent decrees. Overt racism is not an acceptable attitude today, but covert racism is alive and well.
Title: The black struggle for political and Civil Rights in Broward County, 1943-1989.
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Name(s): Kelleher, Richard V.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Mohl, Raymond A., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1990
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 220 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: During the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, Broward County blacks established their place in the ranks of freedom fighters. The Supreme Court decision of 1944 in the case of Smith v. Allright opened the door for the black community to become involved in the political process. Jim Crow laws were eliminated throughout the south. Other covert barriers are now being overcome. At-large elections that prevent black representation are being overturned. Annexation of black neighborhoods has still not been accomplished to any great extent. As a result, thousands of Broward's black residents have no voice in municipal government. Qualified black residents are not registering to vote in numbers that reflect their population. Despite fair housing legislation, discrimination in housing is rampant. Police departments have yet to meet agreed quotas of black officers under federal consent decrees. Overt racism is not an acceptable attitude today, but covert racism is alive and well.
Identifier: 14610 (digitool), FADT14610 (IID), fau:11405 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1990.
Subject(s): African Americans--Civil rights--Florida--Broward County--History--20th century
Political rights--Florida--Broward County--History--20th century
Civil rights--Florida--Broward County--History--20th century
Broward County (Fla)--Race relations
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/14610
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.