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The behavioral attributes of victimized children

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Date Issued:
1990
Summary:
Based on a peer nomination device measuring victimization and aggression (VAI), 172 children from grades four through seven were classified into four subgroups: aggressive victims, nonaggressive victims, aggressive nonvictims, and nonaggressive nonvictims. Another peer nomination inventory measuring 13 behavioral attributes (BAI) was used to assess behaviors correlated with the subject classifications. Distinctive behavioral profiles for the four subgroups were found. Of particular importance were findings supporting the hypothesis that two distinct types of victims exist: aggressive or "provocative" victims and nonaggressive or "passive" victims. Both types of victims lack prosocial skills and reinforce aggressive attacks by crying, but the two types of victims differ in how they elicit aggression. The provocative victim evidences disruptive behavior, blames others, has difficulty managing conflict, and is perceived as dishonest. The passive victim is withdrawn but expresses anxiety and depression, signalling vulnerability. Implications for conceptualization of peer problem behavior and for intervention are discussed.
Title: The behavioral attributes of victimized children.
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Name(s): Pierce, Sharon Louise.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Perry, David G., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1990
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 80 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Based on a peer nomination device measuring victimization and aggression (VAI), 172 children from grades four through seven were classified into four subgroups: aggressive victims, nonaggressive victims, aggressive nonvictims, and nonaggressive nonvictims. Another peer nomination inventory measuring 13 behavioral attributes (BAI) was used to assess behaviors correlated with the subject classifications. Distinctive behavioral profiles for the four subgroups were found. Of particular importance were findings supporting the hypothesis that two distinct types of victims exist: aggressive or "provocative" victims and nonaggressive or "passive" victims. Both types of victims lack prosocial skills and reinforce aggressive attacks by crying, but the two types of victims differ in how they elicit aggression. The provocative victim evidences disruptive behavior, blames others, has difficulty managing conflict, and is perceived as dishonest. The passive victim is withdrawn but expresses anxiety and depression, signalling vulnerability. Implications for conceptualization of peer problem behavior and for intervention are discussed.
Identifier: 14593 (digitool), FADT14593 (IID), fau:11390 (fedora)
Note(s): Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1990.
Subject(s): Victims--Psychology
Aggressiveness in children
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/14593
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.