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Gender differences in children's domain-specific theories of intelligence: Developmental effects upon academic performance

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Date Issued:
1989
Summary:
This study examined gender differences in children's domain-specific theories of intelligence. It was based on Dweck's theory that individuals view intelligence as either fixed (entity theory) or flexible (incremental theory). The hypothesis that the mathematics and verbal domains would differ most for older, brighter girls who are highly sex-typed was partially confirmed in that brighter girls endorsed incremental theory more strongly for the verbal than the math area. Incremental theory was generally endorsed more by girls than boys, by more sex-typed than less sex-typed children, and by brighter than more average children. Interactions indicated the sex difference was strongest among less sex-typed bright children, and sex-typing differences greatest among bright boys. Theory of intelligence had little predictive value for academic performance. It was suggested that future research explore whether greater domain variation may occur in children with average intelligence than was evident here for a sample of generally above-average intelligence.
Title: Gender differences in children's domain-specific theories of intelligence: Developmental effects upon academic performance.
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Name(s): Gaultney, Jane F.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Perry, Louise C., Thesis Advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1989
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 84 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This study examined gender differences in children's domain-specific theories of intelligence. It was based on Dweck's theory that individuals view intelligence as either fixed (entity theory) or flexible (incremental theory). The hypothesis that the mathematics and verbal domains would differ most for older, brighter girls who are highly sex-typed was partially confirmed in that brighter girls endorsed incremental theory more strongly for the verbal than the math area. Incremental theory was generally endorsed more by girls than boys, by more sex-typed than less sex-typed children, and by brighter than more average children. Interactions indicated the sex difference was strongest among less sex-typed bright children, and sex-typing differences greatest among bright boys. Theory of intelligence had little predictive value for academic performance. It was suggested that future research explore whether greater domain variation may occur in children with average intelligence than was evident here for a sample of generally above-average intelligence.
Identifier: 14567 (digitool), FADT14567 (IID), fau:11364 (fedora)
Note(s): Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1989.
Subject(s): Intelligence levels
Academic achievement
Students--Self-rating of
Intellect
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/14567
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.