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MECHANISM OF CONCRETE CRACKING IN SEAWATER DUE TO EMBEDDED METAL CORROSION

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Date Issued:
1977
Summary:
Investigation of concrete-rebar interface conditions was conducted for the purpose of identifying governing parameters of the concrete cracking process in seawater. Experiments included an examination of chloride ion penetration, concrete pH as a function of metallic chloride concentration, and pH distribution within reinforced, impressed current specimens. Metal-concrete systems investigated included iron, molybdenum, cadmium, zinc, aluminum, copper, and nickel. Simplified models of the rebar corrosion process are presented in conjunction with electrochemical analysis of the projected interface chemistry. Results indicated that chlorinities greater than seawater concentration may occur as a result of potential gradients in reinforced concrete. Laboratory simulations of interface chemistry indicated that metallic and chloride ions may produce an acid pH in concrete solutions when present in sufficiently high concentrations. Heasurements of pH on the fracture face of impressed current corrosion specimens indicated localized acidic conditions can develop.
Title: THE MECHANISM OF CONCRETE CRACKING IN SEAWATER DUE TO EMBEDDED METAL CORROSION.
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Name(s): GRIMES, WILLIAM DARWIN.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Hartt, William H., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1977
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 111 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Investigation of concrete-rebar interface conditions was conducted for the purpose of identifying governing parameters of the concrete cracking process in seawater. Experiments included an examination of chloride ion penetration, concrete pH as a function of metallic chloride concentration, and pH distribution within reinforced, impressed current specimens. Metal-concrete systems investigated included iron, molybdenum, cadmium, zinc, aluminum, copper, and nickel. Simplified models of the rebar corrosion process are presented in conjunction with electrochemical analysis of the projected interface chemistry. Results indicated that chlorinities greater than seawater concentration may occur as a result of potential gradients in reinforced concrete. Laboratory simulations of interface chemistry indicated that metallic and chloride ions may produce an acid pH in concrete solutions when present in sufficiently high concentrations. Heasurements of pH on the fracture face of impressed current corrosion specimens indicated localized acidic conditions can develop.
Identifier: 13885 (digitool), FADT13885 (IID), fau:10712 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Engineering and Computer Science
Thesis (M.S.E.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1977.
Subject(s): Reinforced concrete--Corrosion
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/13885
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.