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Development and importance of brachiation: How enclosure design affects activity patterns in captive gibbons (Hylobates lar)

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Date Issued:
2005
Summary:
Knowing how to keep captive gibbons can have an impact on the field of anthropology and, in turn, improve the care of these animals in captivity. A brachiating structure designed for enriching gibbon habitat was constructed on one of two islands in a captive enclosure. The data collected was analyzed on time spent brachiating compared to time spent on the ground. A key factor in collecting data was the placement of the observer with respect to the proximity of the gibbons being observed. In this study the gibbons spent more time on the grass when observing them at close range. The gibbons spent a greater amount of time on the brachiating structure when observed from a distance. Despite complications in data collection, the gibbons displayed preference for the redesigned structure, and were observed brachiating more frequently on the stable supports than the rope supports in the unmodified enclosure.
Title: Development and importance of brachiation: How enclosure design affects activity patterns in captive gibbons (Hylobates lar).
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Name(s): Schwartz, Michele R.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Broadfield, Douglas C., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 65 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Knowing how to keep captive gibbons can have an impact on the field of anthropology and, in turn, improve the care of these animals in captivity. A brachiating structure designed for enriching gibbon habitat was constructed on one of two islands in a captive enclosure. The data collected was analyzed on time spent brachiating compared to time spent on the ground. A key factor in collecting data was the placement of the observer with respect to the proximity of the gibbons being observed. In this study the gibbons spent more time on the grass when observing them at close range. The gibbons spent a greater amount of time on the brachiating structure when observed from a distance. Despite complications in data collection, the gibbons displayed preference for the redesigned structure, and were observed brachiating more frequently on the stable supports than the rope supports in the unmodified enclosure.
Identifier: 9780496991419 (isbn), 13226 (digitool), FADT13226 (IID), fau:10083 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2005.
Subject(s): Gibbons--Behavior
Brachiation
Primates--Anatomy
Mammals--Behavior
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/13226
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.