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Chemical Studies of Caribbean Marine Organisms

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
The projects described in this dissertation concentrated on investigating Caribbean species for qualitative and quantitative chemical differences. Chapter one includes a brief update on the status of natural products as drugs, a discussion of the biodiversity of Caribbean marine organisms as well as a discussion about the chemistry of algae and sponges. In chapter two, an experiment to test for possible effects of warmer, more acidic water and how that will impact coral reef organisms was conducted. Six common Caribbean coral reef sponge species were grown in seawater for 24 days ranging from values experienced at summer-maxima (temperature = 28 ºC; pH = 8.1) to those predicted for the year 2100 (T = 31 ºC; pH = 7.8). For each species, attachment rates, growth, and survival were similar between temperature and pH levels. Only two metabolite concentrations varied significantly between treatments but were similar to baseline levels. In chapter three, a chemical survey of Florida Keys algae was performed using MeOH extraction and HP-20 SPE with varying Me2CO:H2O solutions. 1H NMR spectra were collected for each fraction and analyzed for interesting signals. A Laurencia sp. was extracted and found to contain the known compound isodactylyne (61) with the structure determined using spectroscopic analyses. In chapter four, a Laurencia obtusa specimen was investigated to determine the compound causing oxygenated signals between 4.50 – 4.80 ppm in the 1H NMR spectra observed in chapter three. A large scale extraction and fractionation was performed and the compound was determined to be 1-O-palmitoyl-2-O-myristoyl-3-O-(6-sulfo-α- D-quinovo-pyranosyl)-glycerol (63). In chapter five, the isolation and structural elucidation of a new compound, furocaespitanenone (64) and two known compounds (10R)- and (10S)-10-O-methylfurocaespitanelactol 65 and 66, from a Laurencia sp. collected off of the Florida Keys using MeOH extraction and HP-20 column chromatography is described. A potential biosynthesis of 64 from furocaepsitane (68) is proposed.
Title: Chemical Studies of Caribbean Marine Organisms.
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Name(s): Vansach, Tifanie, author
West, Lyndon M., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2019
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 175 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The projects described in this dissertation concentrated on investigating Caribbean species for qualitative and quantitative chemical differences. Chapter one includes a brief update on the status of natural products as drugs, a discussion of the biodiversity of Caribbean marine organisms as well as a discussion about the chemistry of algae and sponges. In chapter two, an experiment to test for possible effects of warmer, more acidic water and how that will impact coral reef organisms was conducted. Six common Caribbean coral reef sponge species were grown in seawater for 24 days ranging from values experienced at summer-maxima (temperature = 28 ºC; pH = 8.1) to those predicted for the year 2100 (T = 31 ºC; pH = 7.8). For each species, attachment rates, growth, and survival were similar between temperature and pH levels. Only two metabolite concentrations varied significantly between treatments but were similar to baseline levels. In chapter three, a chemical survey of Florida Keys algae was performed using MeOH extraction and HP-20 SPE with varying Me2CO:H2O solutions. 1H NMR spectra were collected for each fraction and analyzed for interesting signals. A Laurencia sp. was extracted and found to contain the known compound isodactylyne (61) with the structure determined using spectroscopic analyses. In chapter four, a Laurencia obtusa specimen was investigated to determine the compound causing oxygenated signals between 4.50 – 4.80 ppm in the 1H NMR spectra observed in chapter three. A large scale extraction and fractionation was performed and the compound was determined to be 1-O-palmitoyl-2-O-myristoyl-3-O-(6-sulfo-α- D-quinovo-pyranosyl)-glycerol (63). In chapter five, the isolation and structural elucidation of a new compound, furocaespitanenone (64) and two known compounds (10R)- and (10S)-10-O-methylfurocaespitanelactol 65 and 66, from a Laurencia sp. collected off of the Florida Keys using MeOH extraction and HP-20 column chromatography is described. A potential biosynthesis of 64 from furocaepsitane (68) is proposed.
Identifier: FA00013274 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2019.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Marine organisms
Caribbean
Algae--chemistry
Sponges--Caribbean Sea
Chemistry
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013274
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.