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American Civil War: The transformation of citizens into soldiers and the disaffection of soldiers for society

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Date Issued:
2001
Summary:
After the firing on Fort Sumter and Abraham Lincoln's subsequent call for volunteer troops, the nation began to mobilize for war in earnest. Many volunteers believed the war would be short in duration, thus they eagerly anticipated the arrival to the seat of war. The Battle of Shiloh, in April of 1862, forced both sides to realize that the war would be a prolonged affair. American soldiers had never witnessed such carnage and savagery on the battlefield. Both Northern and Southern volunteers brought with them a unique understanding of the world, shaped by the common heritage all Americans shared. "Yanks" and "Rebs" believed in many of the same principals, ideals and morals. Their similarities extended to their war experience as well. Both sides experienced the same psychological stresses induced by combat, exposure, hardship and extended absence form home. By the war's end, soldiers came to understand that war had changed them, which in turn affected how they regarded those at home.
Title: The American Civil War: The transformation of citizens into soldiers and the disaffection of soldiers for society.
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Name(s): Ray, Michael Lee.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Engle, Stephen D., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2001
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 158 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: After the firing on Fort Sumter and Abraham Lincoln's subsequent call for volunteer troops, the nation began to mobilize for war in earnest. Many volunteers believed the war would be short in duration, thus they eagerly anticipated the arrival to the seat of war. The Battle of Shiloh, in April of 1862, forced both sides to realize that the war would be a prolonged affair. American soldiers had never witnessed such carnage and savagery on the battlefield. Both Northern and Southern volunteers brought with them a unique understanding of the world, shaped by the common heritage all Americans shared. "Yanks" and "Rebs" believed in many of the same principals, ideals and morals. Their similarities extended to their war experience as well. Both sides experienced the same psychological stresses induced by combat, exposure, hardship and extended absence form home. By the war's end, soldiers came to understand that war had changed them, which in turn affected how they regarded those at home.
Identifier: 9780493218489 (isbn), 12801 (digitool), FADT12801 (IID), fau:9676 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2001.
Subject(s): United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Psychological aspects
Military service, Voluntary--United States
Soldiers--United States--Psychology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12801
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.