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Developmental differences in the source monitoring of efficient and inefficient inhibitors

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Date Issued:
1998
Summary:
Source monitoring capabilities in children four, five, and six years of age classified along high and low inhibition abilities were investigated in three different conditions of source monitoring: reality monitoring, internal source monitoring, and external source monitoring. Specifically, children's misattribution errors in internal and reality source monitoring conditions with regard to their inhibition status was investigated. During one testing session, children were randomly assigned to the three source monitoring conditions and invited to participate in puzzle completion tasks. In the reality source monitoring condition, children and experimenters took turns placing the puzzle pieces on a puzzle board. In the internal source monitoring condition, children were requested to actually place half of the puzzle pieces of their choice and to pretend to place the other half on the board. In the external source monitoring condition, children were requested to watch two different experimenters taking turns placing puzzle pieces on the board. After a short retention interval, children were surprised with a puzzle piece recall test. Children's inhibition abilities were assessed with three different inhibition tasks during a subsequent testing session and consisted of a tapping test, Simon Says test, and response compatibility test. Median splits determined children's inhibition abilities as either high (efficient) or low (inefficient). Sets of analysis of variance tests compared participants' general recall performance abilities among the three conditions of source monitoring and evaluated participants' reality and internal performance abilities with regard to inhibition status. The first set of analyses indicated that children made the most recall errors in the external source monitoring condition and the fewest in the reality source monitoring condition. The second set of analyses revealed that 4-year-old boys, compared to 5- and 6-year-old boys, committed more errors toward the misattribution bias in the internal condition, while 4-year-old girls, compared to 5- and 6-year-old girls, committed more errors against the bias. The third set of analyses supported the hypothesis that inefficient inhibitors on the tapping task committed more errors toward the misattribution bias in the internal source monitoring condition than those in the reality condition.
Title: Developmental differences in the source monitoring of efficient and inefficient inhibitors.
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Name(s): Kennedy, Elizabeth Carol
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Psychology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1998
Date Issued: 1998
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 81 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Source monitoring capabilities in children four, five, and six years of age classified along high and low inhibition abilities were investigated in three different conditions of source monitoring: reality monitoring, internal source monitoring, and external source monitoring. Specifically, children's misattribution errors in internal and reality source monitoring conditions with regard to their inhibition status was investigated. During one testing session, children were randomly assigned to the three source monitoring conditions and invited to participate in puzzle completion tasks. In the reality source monitoring condition, children and experimenters took turns placing the puzzle pieces on a puzzle board. In the internal source monitoring condition, children were requested to actually place half of the puzzle pieces of their choice and to pretend to place the other half on the board. In the external source monitoring condition, children were requested to watch two different experimenters taking turns placing puzzle pieces on the board. After a short retention interval, children were surprised with a puzzle piece recall test. Children's inhibition abilities were assessed with three different inhibition tasks during a subsequent testing session and consisted of a tapping test, Simon Says test, and response compatibility test. Median splits determined children's inhibition abilities as either high (efficient) or low (inefficient). Sets of analysis of variance tests compared participants' general recall performance abilities among the three conditions of source monitoring and evaluated participants' reality and internal performance abilities with regard to inhibition status. The first set of analyses indicated that children made the most recall errors in the external source monitoring condition and the fewest in the reality source monitoring condition. The second set of analyses revealed that 4-year-old boys, compared to 5- and 6-year-old boys, committed more errors toward the misattribution bias in the internal condition, while 4-year-old girls, compared to 5- and 6-year-old girls, committed more errors against the bias. The third set of analyses supported the hypothesis that inefficient inhibitors on the tapping task committed more errors toward the misattribution bias in the internal source monitoring condition than those in the reality condition.
Identifier: 9780591790917 (isbn), 12556 (digitool), FADT12556 (IID), fau:9444 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Adviser: David F. Bjorklund.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1998.
Subject(s): Psychology, Developmental
Psychology, Experimental
Psychology, Cognitive
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12556
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.