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Going to bed hungry: a content analysis of late-night local tv news in southwest Florida.

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Date Issued:
2006-05
Title: Going to bed hungry: a content analysis of late-night local tv news in southwest Florida.
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Name(s): Kmetzko, Mark, creator
School of Communication and Multimedia Studies
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Conference Publication
Date Issued: 2006-05
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 19 p.
Language(s): English
Identifier: 11500 (digitool), FADT11500 (IID), fau:7483 (fedora)
Note(s): Conference Proceeding from the Union for Democratic Communications. Does Southwest Florida’s local TV news simply entertain, or does it give viewers the information they need to stay connected to the community and make informed decisions? To find out, I videotaped a month’s worth of late-night local news and then measured and analyzed it according to geographic scope and news type. Findings included these: • Most of the news was local. State news, however, was scarce; in fact, three times as much news time was devoted to accidents, crimes, and oddities in foreign places, which had no direct effect on life in Southwest Florida. • Weather news outpaced all the categories, especially news of hurricanes—even when there weren’t any. Some news programs had four or more weather segments in a single newscast. • Crime and accident news accounted for more than one-quarter of the news, while education, religion, and arts news were underreported.• Brief, hard-to-follow stories were the rule. When stations allotted more time to a story, however, they often delivered rich, balanced reports. Findings like these are not limited to Southwest Florida but rather reflective of the state of TV news across the country, according to media critics. Although the problems here are not as severe as in some places, there is much room for improvement. Viewers can and should get involved in making that happen, by engaging station management and advertisers.
Subject(s): Mass Media
Communications
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/11500
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU

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