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Man in the age of mechanical reproduction

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Date Issued:
2008
Summary:
Science fiction identifies three characteristics as definitive of and essential to humanity: 1) sentience or self-awareness, 2) emotions, and 3) most importantly, the capacity for sociability. Through the vital possession of these three traits any entity can come to be called human. In the first chapter, I examine Cordwainer Smith's "Scanners Live in Vain" and Samuel R. Delany's "Aye and Gomorrah...," two stories in which human subjects become Other than human. In the second chapter, I explore the prospect of creatures, not biologically human who gain human status through an analysis of Smith's "The Dead Lady of Clown Town" and Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? In the third chapter, I investigate the uniquely science fictional notion that "humanity" does not require biology through a comparison of H.G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau and William Gibson's Idoru.
Title: Man in the age of mechanical reproduction: variations on transhumanism in the works of Smith, Delany, Dick, Wells and Gibson.
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Name(s): Herzek, Charles Barry.
Florida Atlantic University
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Department of English
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: vi, 53 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Science fiction identifies three characteristics as definitive of and essential to humanity: 1) sentience or self-awareness, 2) emotions, and 3) most importantly, the capacity for sociability. Through the vital possession of these three traits any entity can come to be called human. In the first chapter, I examine Cordwainer Smith's "Scanners Live in Vain" and Samuel R. Delany's "Aye and Gomorrah...," two stories in which human subjects become Other than human. In the second chapter, I explore the prospect of creatures, not biologically human who gain human status through an analysis of Smith's "The Dead Lady of Clown Town" and Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? In the third chapter, I investigate the uniquely science fictional notion that "humanity" does not require biology through a comparison of H.G. Wells's The Island of Dr. Moreau and William Gibson's Idoru.
Identifier: 243800667 (oclc), 77644 (digitool), FADT77644 (IID), fau:4304 (fedora)
Note(s): by Charles Barry Herzek.
Works Cited (p. 54), reflected in the Table of Contents, lacking from the University Library's copy.
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2008.
Includes bibliographical references based on the footnotes on pages 51-53.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, FL : 2008 Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Smith, Cordwainer, 1913-1966
Smith, Cordwainer, 1913-1966
Delany, Samuel R
Dick, Philip K
Wells, H.G. (Herbert George), 1866-1946
Gibson, William, 1948-
Characters and characteristics in literature
Humanity
Ethics, Modern -- 20th century
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/77644
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU