You are here

IN MEDICAL EVIDENCE AND PRACTICE, WHAT LEVEL OF UNCERTAINTY IS ACCEPTABLE?

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2020
Abstract/Description:
This thesis addresses the level of uncertainty in medical evidence and practice and asks if this level is acceptable. Current medical standards consider randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the best, and most certain, form of evidence. Similarly, medical practice largely relies on differential diagnosis and diagnostic testing to diagnose patients. I will argue that RCTs as well as differential diagnosis and diagnostic testing contribute to uncertainty in medical practice. In the former, uncertainty stems from lack of representation, elimination of confounding factors, among other issues; while in the latter, uncertainty originates from technological limitations, similarity or variability in presentation, and number of diagnostic possibilities. I will argue that uncertainty in medical evidence and practice can and should be reduced. This can be done by expanding RCT testing and improving it by adding required mechanistic evidence, and by furthering research into better diagnostic technology and training.
Title: IN MEDICAL EVIDENCE AND PRACTICE, WHAT LEVEL OF UNCERTAINTY IS ACCEPTABLE?.
45 views
10 downloads
Name(s): Levine, Hannah , author
Kennedy, Ashley, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Thesis
Date Created: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Jupiter, Florida
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 33 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis addresses the level of uncertainty in medical evidence and practice and asks if this level is acceptable. Current medical standards consider randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the best, and most certain, form of evidence. Similarly, medical practice largely relies on differential diagnosis and diagnostic testing to diagnose patients. I will argue that RCTs as well as differential diagnosis and diagnostic testing contribute to uncertainty in medical practice. In the former, uncertainty stems from lack of representation, elimination of confounding factors, among other issues; while in the latter, uncertainty originates from technological limitations, similarity or variability in presentation, and number of diagnostic possibilities. I will argue that uncertainty in medical evidence and practice can and should be reduced. This can be done by expanding RCT testing and improving it by adding required mechanistic evidence, and by furthering research into better diagnostic technology and training.
Identifier: FAUHT00084 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (B.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, 2020.
Collection: FAU Honors Theses Digital Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FAUHT00084
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.

In Collections