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Identification of Bottlenose Dolphin Prey Within the IRL, Utilizing Images Collected During Observed Dolphin Feeding Behaviors

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Identification of dolphin prey is fundamental to understanding the ecological function of dolphins within the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), and useful in determining shared resources and associated health risks among dolphins and humans. This study utilized 62 images of dolphin prey documented during observed feeding behaviors from 2003 to 2015 to determine prey of significance. Dolphin prey were comprised of: 44% mullet (Mugil spp.), 11% jack (Caranx spp.), 10% pinfish (Lagodon sp.), and 6.5% menhaden (Brevoortia spp.). The remaining 28.5% of prey were comprised of 11 genera, and no spatial or temporal differences among prey were found. The majority (87%) of the genera of fishes documented as dolphin prey are also targeted by local fisheries for human consumption, bait, and sport. Understanding the prey habits of this apex predator can be useful in determining management and conservation strategies for local fisheries and ecosystems, and identifying possible vectors for bioaccumulation of contaminants.
Title: Identification of Bottlenose Dolphin Prey Within the IRL, Utilizing Images Collected During Observed Dolphin Feeding Behaviors.
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Name(s): Grell, Kaitlin
Albrecht, Dan
Waldron, Jordan
Katz, Dana
Nelson, Brandy
Murdoch Titcomb, Elizabeth
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Poster
Date Created: 2018
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Florida
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 1 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Identification of dolphin prey is fundamental to understanding the ecological function of dolphins within the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), and useful in determining shared resources and associated health risks among dolphins and humans. This study utilized 62 images of dolphin prey documented during observed feeding behaviors from 2003 to 2015 to determine prey of significance. Dolphin prey were comprised of: 44% mullet (Mugil spp.), 11% jack (Caranx spp.), 10% pinfish (Lagodon sp.), and 6.5% menhaden (Brevoortia spp.). The remaining 28.5% of prey were comprised of 11 genera, and no spatial or temporal differences among prey were found. The majority (87%) of the genera of fishes documented as dolphin prey are also targeted by local fisheries for human consumption, bait, and sport. Understanding the prey habits of this apex predator can be useful in determining management and conservation strategies for local fisheries and ecosystems, and identifying possible vectors for bioaccumulation of contaminants.
Identifier: FAU_SR00000039 (IID)
Collection: FAU Student Research Digital Collection
Subject(s): College students --Research --United States.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FAU_SR00000039
Restrictions on Access: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.