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Cyclic lipodepsipeptides as lead structures for the discovery of new antiobiotics

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Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
With antimicrobial resistance to current drugs steadily rising, the development of new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action has become an imperative. The majority of life-threatening infections worldwide are caused by "ESKAPE" pathogens which are encountered in more than 40% of hospital-acquired infections, and are resistant to the majority of commonly used antibiotics. Naturally occurring cyclic depsipeptides, microbial secondary metabolites that contain one or more ester bonds in addition to amide bonds, have emerged as an important source of pharmacologically active compounds or lead structures for the development of novel antibiotics. Some of those peptides are either already marketed (daptomycin) or in advanced stages of clinical development (ramoplanin). Structurally simple, yet potent, fusaricidin/LI-F and lysobactin families of naturally occurring antibiotics represent particularly attractive candidates for the development of new antibacterial agents capable of overco ming infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. These natural products exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a variety of clinically relevant fungi and Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, access to these classes of natural products and their synthetic analogs, combined with elucidation of their mode of action represent important initial steps toward full exploitation of their antmicrobial potential. This dissertation describes a general approach toward the solid-phase synthesis of fusaricidin/LI-F and lysobactin analogs and an extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) study. We have devised a simple and robust preparation strategy based on standard Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis protocols.
Title: Cyclic lipodepsipeptides as lead structures for the discovery of new antiobiotics.
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Name(s): Bionda, Nina.
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xv, 197 p. : ill. (some col.)
Language(s): English
Summary: With antimicrobial resistance to current drugs steadily rising, the development of new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action has become an imperative. The majority of life-threatening infections worldwide are caused by "ESKAPE" pathogens which are encountered in more than 40% of hospital-acquired infections, and are resistant to the majority of commonly used antibiotics. Naturally occurring cyclic depsipeptides, microbial secondary metabolites that contain one or more ester bonds in addition to amide bonds, have emerged as an important source of pharmacologically active compounds or lead structures for the development of novel antibiotics. Some of those peptides are either already marketed (daptomycin) or in advanced stages of clinical development (ramoplanin). Structurally simple, yet potent, fusaricidin/LI-F and lysobactin families of naturally occurring antibiotics represent particularly attractive candidates for the development of new antibacterial agents capable of overco ming infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. These natural products exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a variety of clinically relevant fungi and Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, access to these classes of natural products and their synthetic analogs, combined with elucidation of their mode of action represent important initial steps toward full exploitation of their antmicrobial potential. This dissertation describes a general approach toward the solid-phase synthesis of fusaricidin/LI-F and lysobactin analogs and an extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) study. We have devised a simple and robust preparation strategy based on standard Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis protocols.
Summary: The SAR study revealed key structural requirements for fusaricidin/LI-F and related cyclic lipopeptides antibacterial activity, including the presence of the guanidino moietly at the end of the lipidic tail, hydrophobic amino acid residues, and peptide conformation Moreover, substitution of the ester bond with an amide bond significantly improved stability under physiologically relevant conditions and reduced toxicity. In addition, we have shown that these antibacterial peptides exert their mode of action via a novel mechanism, which invloves bacterial membrane interactions, followed by peptide internalization. Altogether, the research described in this dissertation demonstrates that new antibiotics derived from fusaricidin/LI-F natural products, have the potential to meet the challenge of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacteria.
Identifier: 849647426 (oclc), 3360768 (digitool), FADT3360768 (IID), fau:4085 (fedora)
Note(s): by Nina Bionda.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2013.
Includes bibliography.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Reader.
Subject(s): Microbial peptides
Drugs -- Design
Peptides -- Therapeutic use
Genetic engineering
Antibacterial agents
Peptide antibiotics -- Research -- Methodology
Peptide antibiotics -- Analysis
Held by: FBoU FAUER
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/3360768
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU