You are here

Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence for Hippocampal Involvement in Object Motion Processing in C57BL/6J Mice

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2017
Summary:
Considerable research has been carried out to establish a rodent model for the study of human memory, yet functional similarities between the species remain up for debate. The hippocampus, a region deep within the medial temporal lobe of the mammalian CNS, is critical for long-term episodic memory. Projections from the medial entorhinal cortex convey spatial/contextual information, while projections from the lateral entorhinal cortex convey item/object information to the hippocampus. The functional significance of these parallel projections to the rodent hippocampus has been suggested to support spatial processing, while the same projections to the human hippocampus support spatial and non-spatial memory. Discharging in a location-specific manner, hippocampal place cells contribute to spatial memory; however, evidence for neuronal correlates of non-spatial object memory has not been fully defined. The current experiments were designed to address the following questions, while utilizing electrophysiology, functional inactivation during a novel behavioral task, and immunohistochemistry. Is the memory for objects hippocampal-dependent, solely due to the location of the object, or are objects represented within hippocampal activity independent of location? To tease apart spatial and non-spatial processing by the hippocampus, the spatial aspects of 3D objects were enhanced by utilizing movement. A novel discriminatory avoidance task, Knowing Your Enemy, was adapted from an Enemy Avoidance task to test true object memory in mice. Current findings support the notion that object-associations acquisition depends upon a specific context. Retrieval of such object-associations is not context-dependent, yet remains sensitive to temporary inactivation of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. The avoidance impairments observed following hippocampal inactivation were shown to not be a result of reduced anxiety. Immunohistochemical marker expression suggests that the CA1 region was highly active during object exposures, yet the hippocampal system responded differentially to moving and to stationary objects. Recordings of CA1 neurons yielded non-bursting object-related activity during object exploration, and place cell activity remained unaffected in the presence of moving objects; supporting independent, yet simultaneous processing of spatial and non-spatial information within the hippocampus. Together, the current findings support the notion that the CA1 region of the rodent hippocampus processes object-related information, independent of spatial information.
Title: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence for Hippocampal Involvement in Object Motion Processing in C57BL/6J Mice.
45 views
5 downloads
Name(s): Asgeirsdottir, Herborg Nanna, author
Stackman, Robert W., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Psychology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2017
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 204 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Considerable research has been carried out to establish a rodent model for the study of human memory, yet functional similarities between the species remain up for debate. The hippocampus, a region deep within the medial temporal lobe of the mammalian CNS, is critical for long-term episodic memory. Projections from the medial entorhinal cortex convey spatial/contextual information, while projections from the lateral entorhinal cortex convey item/object information to the hippocampus. The functional significance of these parallel projections to the rodent hippocampus has been suggested to support spatial processing, while the same projections to the human hippocampus support spatial and non-spatial memory. Discharging in a location-specific manner, hippocampal place cells contribute to spatial memory; however, evidence for neuronal correlates of non-spatial object memory has not been fully defined. The current experiments were designed to address the following questions, while utilizing electrophysiology, functional inactivation during a novel behavioral task, and immunohistochemistry. Is the memory for objects hippocampal-dependent, solely due to the location of the object, or are objects represented within hippocampal activity independent of location? To tease apart spatial and non-spatial processing by the hippocampus, the spatial aspects of 3D objects were enhanced by utilizing movement. A novel discriminatory avoidance task, Knowing Your Enemy, was adapted from an Enemy Avoidance task to test true object memory in mice. Current findings support the notion that object-associations acquisition depends upon a specific context. Retrieval of such object-associations is not context-dependent, yet remains sensitive to temporary inactivation of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. The avoidance impairments observed following hippocampal inactivation were shown to not be a result of reduced anxiety. Immunohistochemical marker expression suggests that the CA1 region was highly active during object exposures, yet the hippocampal system responded differentially to moving and to stationary objects. Recordings of CA1 neurons yielded non-bursting object-related activity during object exploration, and place cell activity remained unaffected in the presence of moving objects; supporting independent, yet simultaneous processing of spatial and non-spatial information within the hippocampus. Together, the current findings support the notion that the CA1 region of the rodent hippocampus processes object-related information, independent of spatial information.
Identifier: FA00004981 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2017.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Dissertations, Academic -- Florida Atlantic University
Hippocampus (Brain)
Declarative memory
Explicit memory.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004991
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004981
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.