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Religious violence in Frank Herbert's Dune series

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Date Issued:
2012
Summary:
This thesis examines the first two novels of Frank Herbert's Dune series, Dune and Dune Messiah, in order to consider these two novels from the framework of postcolonial theory and analyze how religious violence becomes a source of subjugation, military power, and colonialism within the works. The three chapters of this thesis chart the creation of a colonial project through epistemic violence, physical power, and cultural control enabled by religion. This thesis argues that, in the Dune novels, religious violence functions as a colonial project that closely resembles the goals of real-world colonial enterprises, and the failure to manage this colonial project by those who initiated it shows that the effects of colonial projects based on religious violence are dangerous and uncontrollable.
Title: Religious violence in Frank Herbert's Dune series.
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Name(s): Howard, Kenton Taylor.
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Department of English
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: v, 57 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This thesis examines the first two novels of Frank Herbert's Dune series, Dune and Dune Messiah, in order to consider these two novels from the framework of postcolonial theory and analyze how religious violence becomes a source of subjugation, military power, and colonialism within the works. The three chapters of this thesis chart the creation of a colonial project through epistemic violence, physical power, and cultural control enabled by religion. This thesis argues that, in the Dune novels, religious violence functions as a colonial project that closely resembles the goals of real-world colonial enterprises, and the failure to manage this colonial project by those who initiated it shows that the effects of colonial projects based on religious violence are dangerous and uncontrollable.
Identifier: 820353086 (oclc), 3355558 (digitool), FADT3355558 (IID), fau:3929 (fedora)
Note(s): by Kenton Taylor Howard.
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2012.
Includes bibliography.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Reader.
Subject(s): Herbert, Frank
Herbert, Frank
Science fiction, American -- Criticism and interpretation
Dune (Imaginary place)
Violence -- Religious aspects
Violence in literature
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/3355558
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU