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GIving voice to historical trauma through storytelling

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Date Issued:
2010
Summary:
Objectives: This study documented events contributing to historical trauma among American Indian mission boarding school survivors, described residual effects of that trauma, and verified the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel model as a culturally appropriate tool that enhanced storytelling. Research Design and Methods: Nine women from two Upper Plains tribes were located through snowball sampling and participant referrals. A descriptive exploratory qualitative approach facilitated them in relating their survival stories. Seven were tape-recorded and two were hand-written on the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel, a model specifically designed for this study; this, combined with traditional spiritual grounding ceremonies, enhanced perspective for researcher and participants alike. Data Analysis: Liehr and Smith's (2008) Story Theory guided the methodology in the data gathering and analysis process using the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel combined with taped and written storytelling sessions. Major themes were categorized and supported with interview quotes through inductive analysis of the two research questions: What were the health challenges faced by survivors of American Indian mission boarding schools over time?, and, How have American Indian mission boarding school survivors resolved the health challenges they have faced over time? The first theme, subdivided into Breaking and Silencing of Spirit, examined physical, mental, and sexual abuse. The second theme, Survival of Spirit, examined relationships/parenting, coping/substance abuse, and spirituality. Findings: The seven dimensions described in Lowe and Struthers' (2001) Nursing in Native American Culture Conceptual Framework provided the value structure used for interpretation of findings. Implications for practice and research were related to the seven dimensions as culturally appropriate parameters for nursing.
Title: GIving voice to historical trauma through storytelling: the impact of boarding school experience on American Indians.
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Name(s): Charbonneau-Dahlen, Barbara K.
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xii, 122 p. : ill.
Language(s): English
Summary: Objectives: This study documented events contributing to historical trauma among American Indian mission boarding school survivors, described residual effects of that trauma, and verified the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel model as a culturally appropriate tool that enhanced storytelling. Research Design and Methods: Nine women from two Upper Plains tribes were located through snowball sampling and participant referrals. A descriptive exploratory qualitative approach facilitated them in relating their survival stories. Seven were tape-recorded and two were hand-written on the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel, a model specifically designed for this study; this, combined with traditional spiritual grounding ceremonies, enhanced perspective for researcher and participants alike. Data Analysis: Liehr and Smith's (2008) Story Theory guided the methodology in the data gathering and analysis process using the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel combined with taped and written storytelling sessions. Major themes were categorized and supported with interview quotes through inductive analysis of the two research questions: What were the health challenges faced by survivors of American Indian mission boarding schools over time?, and, How have American Indian mission boarding school survivors resolved the health challenges they have faced over time? The first theme, subdivided into Breaking and Silencing of Spirit, examined physical, mental, and sexual abuse. The second theme, Survival of Spirit, examined relationships/parenting, coping/substance abuse, and spirituality. Findings: The seven dimensions described in Lowe and Struthers' (2001) Nursing in Native American Culture Conceptual Framework provided the value structure used for interpretation of findings. Implications for practice and research were related to the seven dimensions as culturally appropriate parameters for nursing.
Summary: Data analysis identified disturbing themes; unanticipated candor emerged, possibly owing to the fact that the researcher is a historical trauma survivor. Despite having survived historical trauma through the survival of the spirit, each participant struggles to resolve health challenges to this day. Unable to voice mission boarding school experiences for most of their adult lives, each affirmed the rediscovery of Native spirituality empowering; all expressed appreciation for traditional methods woven into storytelling sessions, particularly the Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel, and all indicated they experienced release and healing through telling their stories. Key words: American Indian; historical trauma; nursing; boarding school; Dream Catcher-Medicine Wheel.
Identifier: 701507099 (oclc), 2975245 (digitool), FADT2975245 (IID), fau:3573 (fedora)
Note(s): by Barbara K. Charbonneau-Dahlen.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2010.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2010. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Psychic trauma in children -- Treatment
Resilience (Personality trait)
Identity (Psychology)
Indians of North America -- Cultural assimilation
Indians of North America -- Social conditions
Indians of North America -- Medical care
Boarding schools -- United States -- History -- 21st century
Narrative therapy
Interpersonal relations in children -- Psychological aspects
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/2975245
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU