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Biogenic gas dynamics in peat soil blocks using ground penetrating radar: a comparative study in the laboratory between peat soils from the Everglades and from two northern peatlands in Minnesota and Maine

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Date Issued:
2010
Summary:
Peatlands cover a total area of approximately 3 million square kilometers and are one of the largest natural sources of atmospheric methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Most traditional methods used to estimate biogenic gas dynamics are invasive and provide little or no information about lateral distribution of gas. In contrast, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an emerging technique for non-invasive investigation of gas dynamics in peat soils. This thesis establishes a direct comparison between gas dynamics (i.e. build-up and release) of four different types of peat soil using GPR. Peat soil blocks were collected at peatlands with contrasting latitudes, including the Everglades, Maine and Minnesota. A unique two-antenna GPR setup was used to monitor biogenic gas buildup and ebullition events over a period of 4.5 months, constraining GPR data with surface deformation measurements and direct CH4 and CO2 concentration measurements. The effect of atmospheric pressure was also investigated. This study has implications for better understanding global gas dynamics and carbon cycling in peat soils and its role in climate change.
Title: Biogenic gas dynamics in peat soil blocks using ground penetrating radar: a comparative study in the laboratory between peat soils from the Everglades and from two northern peatlands in Minnesota and Maine.
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Name(s): Cabolova, Anastasija.
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Physics
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xii, 101p. : ill. (some col.)
Language(s): English
Summary: Peatlands cover a total area of approximately 3 million square kilometers and are one of the largest natural sources of atmospheric methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Most traditional methods used to estimate biogenic gas dynamics are invasive and provide little or no information about lateral distribution of gas. In contrast, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an emerging technique for non-invasive investigation of gas dynamics in peat soils. This thesis establishes a direct comparison between gas dynamics (i.e. build-up and release) of four different types of peat soil using GPR. Peat soil blocks were collected at peatlands with contrasting latitudes, including the Everglades, Maine and Minnesota. A unique two-antenna GPR setup was used to monitor biogenic gas buildup and ebullition events over a period of 4.5 months, constraining GPR data with surface deformation measurements and direct CH4 and CO2 concentration measurements. The effect of atmospheric pressure was also investigated. This study has implications for better understanding global gas dynamics and carbon cycling in peat soils and its role in climate change.
Identifier: 700942754 (oclc), 2974433 (digitool), FADT2974433 (IID), fau:3567 (fedora)
Note(s): by Anastasija Cabolova.
Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2010.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2010. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Wetland ecology -- Florida -- Everglades
Wetland ecology -- Minnesota
Wetland ecology -- Maine
Gas dynamics
Soil permeability
Ground penetrating radar
Porous materials -- Fluid dynamics
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/2974433
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU