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Matters of life and death: a comparative analysis of content in Maori traditional and contemporary art and dance as a reflection of fundamental Maori cultural issues and the formation and perpetuation of Maori and non-Maori cultural identity in New Zealan

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Date Issued:
2009
Summary:
Maori art forms are replete with symbolism entrenched in Maori cosmogony, as well as with political issues arising from the relationship of colonizer to colonized. This interdisciplinary project examined the core symbols, issues and stories present in Maori traditional and contemporary art and dance to determine the way in which the content present in these art forms acts as an active agent in the formation and perpetuation of Maori cultural identity in New Zealand. A secondary aim of the project was to examine the relationship of Maori to the greater Aotearoa/New Zealand culture thereby identifying common and contrasting themes and issues present within both cultures. Aotearoa/New Zealand is unique in that the indigenous society has equal rights with the British, now New Zealanders, who colonized them and, through the arts, Maori have gained tremendous ground in becoming a vital partner in the ongoing creation of New Zealand's cultural identity. One of the central issues that repeatedly appeared in all the art forms analyzed was the push and pull that exists for Maori struggling to retain a Maori identity and compete in the non-Maori world. Identity for Aotearoa/New Zealand Maori and Pakeha, or non-Maori, alike is created in response to, in conflict with, in tandem with, and in spite of their respective cultures, thus creating yet another aspect of push and pull dynamics in New Zealand.
Title: Matters of life and death: a comparative analysis of content in Maori traditional and contemporary art and dance as a reflection of fundamental Maori cultural issues and the formation and perpetuation of Maori and non-Maori cultural identity in New Zealand.
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Name(s): Zaitz, Cynthia Louise.
Florida Atlantic University
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Department of Theatre and Dance
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xvi, 246 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Maori art forms are replete with symbolism entrenched in Maori cosmogony, as well as with political issues arising from the relationship of colonizer to colonized. This interdisciplinary project examined the core symbols, issues and stories present in Maori traditional and contemporary art and dance to determine the way in which the content present in these art forms acts as an active agent in the formation and perpetuation of Maori cultural identity in New Zealand. A secondary aim of the project was to examine the relationship of Maori to the greater Aotearoa/New Zealand culture thereby identifying common and contrasting themes and issues present within both cultures. Aotearoa/New Zealand is unique in that the indigenous society has equal rights with the British, now New Zealanders, who colonized them and, through the arts, Maori have gained tremendous ground in becoming a vital partner in the ongoing creation of New Zealand's cultural identity. One of the central issues that repeatedly appeared in all the art forms analyzed was the push and pull that exists for Maori struggling to retain a Maori identity and compete in the non-Maori world. Identity for Aotearoa/New Zealand Maori and Pakeha, or non-Maori, alike is created in response to, in conflict with, in tandem with, and in spite of their respective cultures, thus creating yet another aspect of push and pull dynamics in New Zealand.
Summary: Within the context of dance ethnology and visuals arts methodologies several methods were employed including: archival reviews; in situ examination and visual analysis of the meaning and value of these Maori art forms; information exchange sessions, which have been presented individually within the text, with Maori elders, educators, traditional and contemporary choreographers and performers, traditional and contemporary visual artists, and other knowledgeable individuals; the identification of recurrent themes and symbolism, which provide the basis for the synthesis of the information collected. The project involved nine years of research prior to a two-month in situ examination of Maori art, dance and culture.
Identifier: 417651738 (oclc), 210449 (digitool), FADT210449 (IID), fau:3407 (fedora)
Note(s): by Cynthia Louise Zaitz.
Vita.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2009.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2009. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Maori (New Zealand people) -- Ethnic identity
Folk art -- New Zealand
Art, Modern -- 21st century -- Primitive influences
New Zealand -- Social life and customs
Held by: FBoU FAUER
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/210449
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU