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The Effect of a Culturally Relevant Cardiovascular Health Promotion Program on Rural African Americans

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Date Issued:
2015
Summary:
Health disparities among rural African Americans include disproportionately higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with cardiovascular disease. Interventions designed to decrease cardiovascular risk can potentially improve health outcomes among rural, underserved communities. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of a cardiovascular health promotion intervention among rural African Americans. An experimental study randomized by church clusters was done in two rural counties in northern Florida. A total of 229 participants, 114 in the intervention group and 115 in the control group, were recruited from twelve rural African American churches. The pretest-posttest design included instruments chosen to measure cardiovascular health habits and knowledge as well as changes in produce consumption, dietary fat intake, and exercise using the major components of the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction: intentions, norms, attitudes, and self-efficacy. Linear mixed model was the statistical test used to detect the program effects. Participants who received the intervention had significant increases in scores for the cardiovascular health habits (p < .01) and health knowledge (p < .01) variables compared with the control group. There were also significant group differences regarding intentions to increase produce consumption (p < .01) and reduce dietary fat intake (p < .01). The cardiovascular health program was associated with other statistically significant results including produce consumption attitudes (p = .01) and norms (p < .01), dietary fat attitudes (p = .04) and norms (p < .01), and exercise attitudes (p < .01). There were also significant results found for perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy regarding increasing produce consumption (p < .01), reducing dietary fat intake (p = .03), and increasing exercise (p = .01). Compared to the control group, the cardiovascular health promotion intervention was effective in fostering positive health effects for most of the variables measured. The findings supported the theoretical framework used for guiding the study, the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction Nurse-led health promotion interventions within church settings can be effective means for reducing overall cardiovascular risk and health disparities among rural African American populations.
Title: The Effect of a Culturally Relevant Cardiovascular Health Promotion Program on Rural African Americans.
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Name(s): Abbott, Laurie S., author
Williams, Christine L., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2015
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 232 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Health disparities among rural African Americans include disproportionately higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with cardiovascular disease. Interventions designed to decrease cardiovascular risk can potentially improve health outcomes among rural, underserved communities. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of a cardiovascular health promotion intervention among rural African Americans. An experimental study randomized by church clusters was done in two rural counties in northern Florida. A total of 229 participants, 114 in the intervention group and 115 in the control group, were recruited from twelve rural African American churches. The pretest-posttest design included instruments chosen to measure cardiovascular health habits and knowledge as well as changes in produce consumption, dietary fat intake, and exercise using the major components of the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction: intentions, norms, attitudes, and self-efficacy. Linear mixed model was the statistical test used to detect the program effects. Participants who received the intervention had significant increases in scores for the cardiovascular health habits (p < .01) and health knowledge (p < .01) variables compared with the control group. There were also significant group differences regarding intentions to increase produce consumption (p < .01) and reduce dietary fat intake (p < .01). The cardiovascular health program was associated with other statistically significant results including produce consumption attitudes (p = .01) and norms (p < .01), dietary fat attitudes (p = .04) and norms (p < .01), and exercise attitudes (p < .01). There were also significant results found for perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy regarding increasing produce consumption (p < .01), reducing dietary fat intake (p = .03), and increasing exercise (p = .01). Compared to the control group, the cardiovascular health promotion intervention was effective in fostering positive health effects for most of the variables measured. The findings supported the theoretical framework used for guiding the study, the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction Nurse-led health promotion interventions within church settings can be effective means for reducing overall cardiovascular risk and health disparities among rural African American populations.
Identifier: FA00004475 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2015.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): African Americans -- Health and hygiene
African Americans -- Health services accessibility
African Americans -- Health services accessibility
Cultural awareness -- United States
Discrimination in medical care
Health status indicators -- United States
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004475
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.