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An American way to talk: forums as civic education in the 1930s

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Date Issued:
2009-01-30
Title: An American way to talk: forums as civic education in the 1930s.
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Name(s): Keith, William, creator
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Conference Presentation
Date Issued: 2009-01-30
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University Libraries’ Digital Library [digital object]
Physical Description: 1 Conference paper text/pdf (ca. 15 p.): digital. Program text/pdf (ca. 10 p.): digital.
Language(s): English
Identifier: 186662 (digitool), FADT186662 (IID), fau:31898 (fedora)
Note(s): One might say, based on concerns over the state of democratic participation and engagement, that while civic education is a perennial concern in America, as with many other similar things, it’s not something Americans have felt the need to legislate or especially organize. Aside from high school civics classes and various celebratory activities (Fourth of July parades, essay contests and so forth), Americans have not developed highly organized civic education, especially for adults. The argument in this paper is that in indirect ways there have been, throughout American history, institutions that functionally provided civic education to adults. I will first review some distinctions about civic education, then look at the historical dimensions of adult civic education, and finally suggest ways in which we might profitably return to the past.
Subject(s): Civics -- Study and teaching -- United States
Adult education -- United States
Political socialization -- United States
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/186662
Restrictions on Access: Electronic version created 2009, Florida Atlantic University
Host Institution: FAU

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Title: An American way to talk: forums as civic education in the 1930s.
Name(s): Keith, William, creator
Jack Miller Forum
Department of Political Science
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Conference Presentation
Date Issued: 2009-01-30
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Florida
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 15 p.
Language(s): English
Identifier: 186663 (digitool), FADT186663p (IID)
Note(s): One might say, based on concerns over the state of democratic participation and engagement, that while civic education is a perennial concern in America, as with many other similar things, it’s not something Americans have felt the need to legislate or especially organize. Aside from high school civics classes and various celebratory activities (Fourth of July parades, essay contests and so forth), Americans have not developed highly organized civic education, especially for adults. The argument in this paper is that in indirect ways there have been, throughout American history, institutions that functionally provided civic education to adults. I will first review some distinctions about civic education, then look at the historical dimensions of adult civic education, and finally suggest ways in which we might profitably return to the past.
Subject(s): Civics -- Study and teaching -- United States
Adult education -- United States
Political socialization -- United States
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FADT186663p
Use and Reproduction: Author retains rights.
Host Institution: FAU

In Collections