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Imperialism and the 1999 Women's World Cup

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Date Issued:
2009
Summary:
This research examines the U.S. media during the 1999 Women's World Cup from a feminist postcolonial standpoint. This research adds to current feminist scholarship on women and sports by de-centering the global North in its discourse. It reveals the bias of the media through the representation of the United States National Team as a universal "woman" athlete and the standard for international women's soccer. It further argues that, as a result, the Nigerian National Team was cast in simplistic stereotypes of race, class, ethnicity, and nation, which were often also appropriated and commodified. I emphasize that the Nigerian National Team resisted this construction and fought to secure their position in the global soccer landscape. I conclude that these biased representations, which did not fairly depict or value the contributions of diverse competing teams, were primarily employed to promote and sell the event to a predominantly white middle-class American audience.
Title: Imperialism and the 1999 Women's World Cup: representations of the United States and Nigerian national teams in the U.S.
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Name(s): Canning, Michele.
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
electronic resource
Extent: viii, 145 p. : ill. (some col.).
Language(s): English
Summary: This research examines the U.S. media during the 1999 Women's World Cup from a feminist postcolonial standpoint. This research adds to current feminist scholarship on women and sports by de-centering the global North in its discourse. It reveals the bias of the media through the representation of the United States National Team as a universal "woman" athlete and the standard for international women's soccer. It further argues that, as a result, the Nigerian National Team was cast in simplistic stereotypes of race, class, ethnicity, and nation, which were often also appropriated and commodified. I emphasize that the Nigerian National Team resisted this construction and fought to secure their position in the global soccer landscape. I conclude that these biased representations, which did not fairly depict or value the contributions of diverse competing teams, were primarily employed to promote and sell the event to a predominantly white middle-class American audience.
Identifier: 321040873 (oclc), 192982 (digitool), FADT192982 (IID), fau:2973 (fedora)
Note(s): by Michele Canning.
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2009.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2009. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): World Cup (Soccer)
FIFA Women's World Cup
Women soccer players -- Nigeria
Soccer for women -- United States
Imperialism -- Psychological aspects
Nationalism and sports
Mass media and sports
Held by: FBoU FAUER
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/192982
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU