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Durability of a recycled aggregate concrete base course material under coupled environmental exposure and cyclic

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Date Issued:
2014
Summary:
Long term durability is a major concern for wide-scale use of recycled aggregate materials in civil engineering construction. The purpose of this study is to provide an insight into the damaging effects of combined wet-dry cycles and repeated mechanical loading in a recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) base course material made from recycled crushed concrete aggregate and cement. A coordinated experimental program followed by a mechanistic pavement modeling and life cycle analysis was conducted as part of this research study. This laboratory investigation was divided into three phases each consisting of both wet-dry exposed specimens (WD), and control or non wet-dry exposed specimens (NWD). Phase I experiments involved monotonic loading tests under compression and flexure to evaluate the strength properties. Phase II involved testing a total of 108 cylindrical specimens in cyclic compressive loading at three different stress ratios. After each regime of cyclic loading, residual compressive strengths were determined. In addition, the load-deformation hysteresis loops and the accumulated plastic deformation were continuously monitored through all loading cycles. Phase III included a flexural fatigue test program on 39 beam specimens, and fracture testing program on 6 notched beam specimens, each one having 19-mm initial notch. Traditional SR-N curves, relating the Stress Ratio (SR) with the number of cycles to failure (N or Nf), were developed. Fatigue crack growth rate and changes in Stress Intensity Factors were obtained to determine Paris Law constants and fracture toughness. A mechanistic analysis of a typical highway pavement incorporating RAC base was performed with KENPAVE program, followed by a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) using the GaBi software. It was found that the specimens subjected to wet-dry cycles suffered significantly higher damage expressed in terms of accumulated plastic deformation, and loss of residual compressive strength, modulus, fatigue endurance limit, and design life, compared to specimens not exposed to wet-dry cycles. Although such degradation in material properties are important considerations in pavement design, a concurrent Life Cycle Analysis demonstrated that recycled aggregate concrete base course still holds promise as an alternative construction material from environmental stand point.
Title: Durability of a recycled aggregate concrete base course material under coupled environmental exposure and cyclic.
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Name(s): Gonzalez, Lillian, author
Sobhan, Khaled, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatics Engineering
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2014
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 172 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Long term durability is a major concern for wide-scale use of recycled aggregate materials in civil engineering construction. The purpose of this study is to provide an insight into the damaging effects of combined wet-dry cycles and repeated mechanical loading in a recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) base course material made from recycled crushed concrete aggregate and cement. A coordinated experimental program followed by a mechanistic pavement modeling and life cycle analysis was conducted as part of this research study. This laboratory investigation was divided into three phases each consisting of both wet-dry exposed specimens (WD), and control or non wet-dry exposed specimens (NWD). Phase I experiments involved monotonic loading tests under compression and flexure to evaluate the strength properties. Phase II involved testing a total of 108 cylindrical specimens in cyclic compressive loading at three different stress ratios. After each regime of cyclic loading, residual compressive strengths were determined. In addition, the load-deformation hysteresis loops and the accumulated plastic deformation were continuously monitored through all loading cycles. Phase III included a flexural fatigue test program on 39 beam specimens, and fracture testing program on 6 notched beam specimens, each one having 19-mm initial notch. Traditional SR-N curves, relating the Stress Ratio (SR) with the number of cycles to failure (N or Nf), were developed. Fatigue crack growth rate and changes in Stress Intensity Factors were obtained to determine Paris Law constants and fracture toughness. A mechanistic analysis of a typical highway pavement incorporating RAC base was performed with KENPAVE program, followed by a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) using the GaBi software. It was found that the specimens subjected to wet-dry cycles suffered significantly higher damage expressed in terms of accumulated plastic deformation, and loss of residual compressive strength, modulus, fatigue endurance limit, and design life, compared to specimens not exposed to wet-dry cycles. Although such degradation in material properties are important considerations in pavement design, a concurrent Life Cycle Analysis demonstrated that recycled aggregate concrete base course still holds promise as an alternative construction material from environmental stand point.
Identifier: FA00004116 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2014.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Aggregates (Building materials ) -- Recycling
Concrete -- Mechanical properties
Construction and demolition debris -- Recycling
Structural engineering
Sustainable construction
Waste products as road materials
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004116
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004116
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.