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An examination of biomedical intellectual reputation in relationship to graduates’ productivity, regional innovation and absorptive capacity at selected universities worldwide

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Date Issued:
2014
Summary:
The purpose of this study was first to determine factors associated with intellectual reputation, specifically among selected biomedical departments worldwide within the university setting. Second, the study aimed to examine intellectual reputation in relationship to doctoral graduates’ productivity in the biomedical sciences and in relationship to organizational biomedical advancement and productivity. Third, the study aimed to visualize a spatial relationship between intellectual reputation and local organizational biomedical advancement and productivity in the United States and the United Kingdom. Finally, a simulated research-based model was proposed for understanding hospital productivity. The study used quantitative analysis in order to achieve these goals. The Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geocommons were used to visualize possible relationship between universities and hospitals in different regions. The findings from this study suggest that the university’s research intensity, having a Nobel Laureate on staff, Hirsch Index of the most prominent researcher on staff, scientific patent, scientific publications, and affiliation with multiple countries are good predictors of intellectual reputation. Correlation analysis suggests that university intellectual reputation is associated with doctoral graduates’ productivity. When examining the relationship between the university and hospitals, university intellectual reputation was positively correlated with hospital biomedical advancement, r= .445, p =0.001. Hospital productivity was significantly correlated with university intellectual reputation, r= .322, p =0.001. University intellectual reputation was significantly correlated with hospital capacity to absorb knowledge (r= 0.211, p =0.005) and knowledge spillover (r=.242, p =0.001). Regression analysis reveals that hospital capacity to absorb knowledge and knowledge spillover are good predictors of hospital biomedical advancement, F (2, 176) = 52.637, p = 0.001. Hospital capacity to absorb knowledge, affiliation with a university, intellectual reputation of the affiliated university, and distance between the hospital and the affiliated university were shown to be good predictors to hospital productivity, F (4, 106) = 11.115, p = 0.001. Visual examination of the hospitals suggests that when the universities publish at a large quantity, this tends to influence the hospitals within the area to publish a large quantity as well. Additionally, hospitals that are more productive tend to cluster around universities with higher intellectual reputation.
Title: An examination of biomedical intellectual reputation in relationship to graduates’ productivity, regional innovation and absorptive capacity at selected universities worldwide.
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Name(s): Cavanaugh, Gesulla, author
Wright, Dianne A., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Education
Department of Educational Leadership and Research Methodology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2014
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 117 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this study was first to determine factors associated with intellectual reputation, specifically among selected biomedical departments worldwide within the university setting. Second, the study aimed to examine intellectual reputation in relationship to doctoral graduates’ productivity in the biomedical sciences and in relationship to organizational biomedical advancement and productivity. Third, the study aimed to visualize a spatial relationship between intellectual reputation and local organizational biomedical advancement and productivity in the United States and the United Kingdom. Finally, a simulated research-based model was proposed for understanding hospital productivity. The study used quantitative analysis in order to achieve these goals. The Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geocommons were used to visualize possible relationship between universities and hospitals in different regions. The findings from this study suggest that the university’s research intensity, having a Nobel Laureate on staff, Hirsch Index of the most prominent researcher on staff, scientific patent, scientific publications, and affiliation with multiple countries are good predictors of intellectual reputation. Correlation analysis suggests that university intellectual reputation is associated with doctoral graduates’ productivity. When examining the relationship between the university and hospitals, university intellectual reputation was positively correlated with hospital biomedical advancement, r= .445, p =0.001. Hospital productivity was significantly correlated with university intellectual reputation, r= .322, p =0.001. University intellectual reputation was significantly correlated with hospital capacity to absorb knowledge (r= 0.211, p =0.005) and knowledge spillover (r=.242, p =0.001). Regression analysis reveals that hospital capacity to absorb knowledge and knowledge spillover are good predictors of hospital biomedical advancement, F (2, 176) = 52.637, p = 0.001. Hospital capacity to absorb knowledge, affiliation with a university, intellectual reputation of the affiliated university, and distance between the hospital and the affiliated university were shown to be good predictors to hospital productivity, F (4, 106) = 11.115, p = 0.001. Visual examination of the hospitals suggests that when the universities publish at a large quantity, this tends to influence the hospitals within the area to publish a large quantity as well. Additionally, hospitals that are more productive tend to cluster around universities with higher intellectual reputation.
Identifier: FA00004090 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2014.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Academic achievement -- Measurement
Educational productivity -- Measurement
Universities and colleges -- Ratings and rankings
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004090
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004090
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.