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Assemblage dynamics of exotic herpetofauna on Jupiter campus of Florida Atlantic University

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Date Issued:
2007
Summary:
Many species considered exotic, by both biological definition and social construction, have been introduced into South Florida. These species compete for resources with native species and with each other. In this study, I surveyed the John D. MacArthur Campus of Florida Atlantic University in Jupiter Florida during spring and fall of 2005 to determine the assemblage dynamics of several exotic herpetofauna species, primarily the nocturnal Wood Slave gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia), the Indo- Pacific gecko (H. garnotii), and the diurnal Cuban brown anole (Anolis sagrei). I found that the more recently established (H. mabouia) was out-competing (H. garnotii) on most of the buildings being surveyed. The study also showed that the Cuban treefrog, (Osteopilus septentrionalis) population affected the gecko populations significantly. (A. sagrei) was the primary anole found on campus, with sightings of (A. carolinensis) the native Florida green anole, being rare.
Title: Assemblage dynamics of exotic herpetofauna on Jupiter campus of Florida Atlantic University.
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Name(s): Kingsland, Kimber
Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Thesis
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
application/pdf
Extent: 37 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Many species considered exotic, by both biological definition and social construction, have been introduced into South Florida. These species compete for resources with native species and with each other. In this study, I surveyed the John D. MacArthur Campus of Florida Atlantic University in Jupiter Florida during spring and fall of 2005 to determine the assemblage dynamics of several exotic herpetofauna species, primarily the nocturnal Wood Slave gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia), the Indo- Pacific gecko (H. garnotii), and the diurnal Cuban brown anole (Anolis sagrei). I found that the more recently established (H. mabouia) was out-competing (H. garnotii) on most of the buildings being surveyed. The study also showed that the Cuban treefrog, (Osteopilus septentrionalis) population affected the gecko populations significantly. (A. sagrei) was the primary anole found on campus, with sightings of (A. carolinensis) the native Florida green anole, being rare.
Identifier: 314377169 (oclc), 11609 (digitool), FADT11609 (IID), fau:1341 (fedora)
Note(s): by Kimber Kingsland.
Thesis (B.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, Honors College, 2007.
Bibliography: leaves 24-27.
Subject(s): Amphibians -- Florida -- Jupiter -- John D. MacArthur Campus
Reptiles -- Florida -- Jupiter -- John D. MacArthur Campus
Biological diversity conservation -- Florida -- Jupiter -- John D. MacArthur Campus
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/11609
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FADT11609
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.
Is Part of Series: FAU Honors Theses Digital Collection.

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