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(Re)making men, representing the Caribbean Nation: authorialIndividuation in works by Fred D’Aguiar, Robert Antoni, andMarlon James

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Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
This dissertation proposes that West Indian contemporary male writers develop literary authority, or a voice that represents the nation, via a process of individuation. This process enables the contemporary male writer to unite the disparities of the matriarchal and patriarchal authorial traditions that inform his development of a distinctive creative identity. I outline three stages of authorial individuation that are inspired by Jung’s theory of individuation. The first is the contemporary male writer’s return to his nationalist forebears’ tradition to dissolve his persona, or identification with patriarchal authority; Fred D’Aguiar’s “The Last Essay About Slavery” and Feeding the Ghosts illustrate this stage. The second is his reconciliation of matriarchal (present) and patriarchal (past) traditions of literary authority via his encounter with his forebears’ feminized, raced shadow; Robert Antoni’s Blessed Is the Fruit evidences this process. The third is the contemporary male writer’s renunciation of authority defined by masculinity, which emerges as his incorporation of the anima, or unconscious feminine; Marlon James’s The Book of Night Women exemplifies this final phase of his individuation.
Title: (Re)making men, representing the Caribbean Nation: authorialIndividuation in works by Fred D’Aguiar, Robert Antoni, andMarlon James.
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Name(s): Gifford, Sheryl C., author
Machado, Elena, Thesis advisor
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, Degree grantor
Department of English
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: single unit
Date Created: Fall 2013
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: Online Resource
Extent: 261 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This dissertation proposes that West Indian contemporary male writers develop literary authority, or a voice that represents the nation, via a process of individuation. This process enables the contemporary male writer to unite the disparities of the matriarchal and patriarchal authorial traditions that inform his development of a distinctive creative identity. I outline three stages of authorial individuation that are inspired by Jung’s theory of individuation. The first is the contemporary male writer’s return to his nationalist forebears’ tradition to dissolve his persona, or identification with patriarchal authority; Fred D’Aguiar’s “The Last Essay About Slavery” and Feeding the Ghosts illustrate this stage. The second is his reconciliation of matriarchal (present) and patriarchal (past) traditions of literary authority via his encounter with his forebears’ feminized, raced shadow; Robert Antoni’s Blessed Is the Fruit evidences this process. The third is the contemporary male writer’s renunciation of authority defined by masculinity, which emerges as his incorporation of the anima, or unconscious feminine; Marlon James’s The Book of Night Women exemplifies this final phase of his individuation.
Identifier: FA0004021 (IID)
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2013.
Subject(s): Antoni, Robert -- 1958- -- Blessed is the fruit -- Criticism and interpretation
D'Aguiar, Fred -- 1960- -- Feeding the ghosts -- Criticism and interpretation
D'Aguiar, Fred -- 1960- -- Last essay about slavery -- Criticism and interpretation
James, Marlon -- 1970- -- Book of night women -- Criticism and interpretation
Jungian psychology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library
Sublocation: Boca Raton, Fla.
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA0004021
Restrictions on Access: All rights reserved by the source institution
Restrictions on Access: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU