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"Yankees of the Orient": Yamato and Japanese immigration to America

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Date Issued:
1990
Summary:
The social, economic, and political changes created by the Meiji Restoration triggered Japanese emigration. Economically distressed farmers, planning on staying in America a short time, accounted for most of the Japanese on the Pacific Coast. Most history of Japanese immigration to America focuses on the Pacific states and their anti-Japanese stance. Florida's Japanese colony, Yamato, however, presents a different perspective of the Japanese immigrant experience in two ways. Instead of farmers, Yamato's first settlers included college-educated, ex-samurai men who came to America with every intention of staying. These men shared a common vision based on the unique Christian education that they had received at Kyoto's Doshisha College. At odds with the political conservatism Japan adopted in the mid-1890s, these young men hoped to build new lives in America. Secondly, in the beginning, Florida, a newly developing state, warmly welcomed and supported the establishment of Japanese colonies in the state.
Title: "Yankees of the Orient": Yamato and Japanese immigration to America.
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Name(s): Lloyd, Joanne Marie.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Curl, Donald W., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1990
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 145 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The social, economic, and political changes created by the Meiji Restoration triggered Japanese emigration. Economically distressed farmers, planning on staying in America a short time, accounted for most of the Japanese on the Pacific Coast. Most history of Japanese immigration to America focuses on the Pacific states and their anti-Japanese stance. Florida's Japanese colony, Yamato, however, presents a different perspective of the Japanese immigrant experience in two ways. Instead of farmers, Yamato's first settlers included college-educated, ex-samurai men who came to America with every intention of staying. These men shared a common vision based on the unique Christian education that they had received at Kyoto's Doshisha College. At odds with the political conservatism Japan adopted in the mid-1890s, these young men hoped to build new lives in America. Secondly, in the beginning, Florida, a newly developing state, warmly welcomed and supported the establishment of Japanese colonies in the state.
Identifier: 14653 (digitool), FADT14653 (IID), fau:12699 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1990.
Subject(s): Immigrants
Japanese--United States
Japanese--Florida
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/14653
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.