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"Headlong Hall" to "Gryll Grange": A comparison of the first and last novels of Thomas Love Peacock

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Date Issued:
1988
Summary:
Thomas Love Peacock is best known for the five unique "novels of talk" that he wrote between 1815 and 1860. The first, Headlong Hall, contains humorous satire of topical issues in a dialogue format, with a weak love plot linking the episodic action. Most characters are based partially on real people and bear extreme and unyielding points of view. These two-dimensional ideologues debate the main theme, the perfectibility of man. In Gryll Grange, written some forty-five years later, the plot is a more believable love story with realistic characters. The tone mellows, Peacock's focus turns from social to personal, and the theme of living the best possible life results in comedy but not in sharp satire. Love and happy marriage constitute a symbol of Peacock's hope for the resolution of the real and the ideal.
Title: "Headlong Hall" to "Gryll Grange": A comparison of the first and last novels of Thomas Love Peacock.
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Name(s): Cochran, Michael Edward.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Coyle, William, Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 1988
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 72 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Thomas Love Peacock is best known for the five unique "novels of talk" that he wrote between 1815 and 1860. The first, Headlong Hall, contains humorous satire of topical issues in a dialogue format, with a weak love plot linking the episodic action. Most characters are based partially on real people and bear extreme and unyielding points of view. These two-dimensional ideologues debate the main theme, the perfectibility of man. In Gryll Grange, written some forty-five years later, the plot is a more believable love story with realistic characters. The tone mellows, Peacock's focus turns from social to personal, and the theme of living the best possible life results in comedy but not in sharp satire. Love and happy marriage constitute a symbol of Peacock's hope for the resolution of the real and the ideal.
Identifier: 14475 (digitool), FADT14475 (IID), fau:11273 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1988.
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Subject(s): Peacock, Thomas Love,--1785-1866--Headlong Hall
Peacock, Thomas Love,--1785-1866--Gryll Grange
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/14475
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.