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ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECONNAISSANCE OF ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS

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Date Issued:
1974
Summary:
In December of 1973 the writer conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of the Bahamian islands of Eleuthera, Harbor Island and St. George's Cay. A total of fifteen open village sites were found along the lee shore of Eleuthera. A surface collection was made at each site and a stratigraphic pit was dug at one site, El-8. Analysis of the artifacts recovered indicated that the Bahamian Arawaks possessed a cultural system distinct from other Arawak populations,- which was specifically adapted to the Bahamian environment. Four ceramic types were isolated and defined within the Palmetto ceramic complex. Examination of the data pertinent to settlement and community patterning suggested a culture possessing little stratification and an economic system less productive than that of the Antillian Arawak.
Title: ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECONNAISSANCE OF ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS.
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Name(s): SULLIVAN, SHAUN DORSEY.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Sears, William H., Thesis advisor
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Department of Anthropology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1974
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 75 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: In December of 1973 the writer conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of the Bahamian islands of Eleuthera, Harbor Island and St. George's Cay. A total of fifteen open village sites were found along the lee shore of Eleuthera. A surface collection was made at each site and a stratigraphic pit was dug at one site, El-8. Analysis of the artifacts recovered indicated that the Bahamian Arawaks possessed a cultural system distinct from other Arawak populations,- which was specifically adapted to the Bahamian environment. Four ceramic types were isolated and defined within the Palmetto ceramic complex. Examination of the data pertinent to settlement and community patterning suggested a culture possessing little stratification and an economic system less productive than that of the Antillian Arawak.
Identifier: 13640 (digitool), FADT13640 (IID), fau:10478 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1974.
Subject(s): Bahamas--Antiquities
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/13640
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.